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But for all the highs, Braithwaite's career has had its share of lows. In the early '90s he was sued by former managers over fee entitlements before he and his record label parted ways he re-signed with Sony in Since then, Braithwaite has toured widely and will appear at Falls Festival at the end of the year.

The singer joked that he'll have to practise his on-stage banter given a large chunk of the crowd will be 18 years old and born well after Horses dominated the airwaves.

The Sydney Morning Herald. I, who have such a horror of bloodshed, consider even killing in self-defense murder, who cannot wish them the slightest evil, whose only prayer is to have them sent back in peace to their own country, - I talk of killing them!

For what else do I wear a pistol and carving-knife? I am afraid I will try them on the first one who says an insolent word to me.

Yes, and repent for it ever after in sackcloth and ashes. Then I could don the breeches, and slay them with a will!

Page 25 If some few Southern women were in the ranks, they could set the men an example they would not blush to follow.

We are all men! May 10th. Last night about one o'clock I was wakened and told that mother and Miriam had come. Oh, how glad I was! I tumbled out of bed half asleep and hugged Miriam in a dream, but waked up when I got to mother.

They came up under a flag of truce, on a boat going up for provisions, which, by the way, was brought to by half a dozen Yankee ships in succession, with a threat to send a broadside into her if she did not stop - the wretches knew it must be under a flag of truce; no boats leave, except by special order to procure provisions.

What tales they had to tell! They were on the wharf, and saw the ships sail up the river, saw the broadside fired into Will Pinckney's regiment, the boats we fired, our gunboats, floating down to meet them all wrapped in flames; twenty thousand bales of cotton blazing in a single pile; molasses and sugar thrown over everything.

They stood there opposite to where one of the ships landed, expecting a broadside, and resolute not to be shot in the back.

I wish I had been there! And Captain Huger is not dead! They had hopes of his life for the first time day before yesterday. Miriam saw the ball that had just been extracted.

He will probably be lame for the rest of his life. It will be a glory to him. For even Page 26 the Federal officers say that never did they see so gallant a little ship, or one that fought so desperately as the McRae.

Men and officers fought like devils. Think of all those great leviathans after the poor little "Widow Mickey"! One came tearing down on her sideways, while the Brooklyn fired on her from the other side, when brave Captain Warley put the nose of the Manassas under the first, and tilted her over so that the whole broadside passed over, instead of through, the McRae, who spit back its poor little fire at both.

And after all was lost, she carried the wounded and the prisoners to New Orleans, and was scuttled by her own men in port.

Glorious Captain Huger! And think of his sending word to Jimmy, suffering as he was, that "his little brass cannon was game to the last.

I hope he will recover. Brave, dare-devil Captain Warley is prisoner, and on the way to Fort Warren, that home of all brave, patriotic men.

We'll have him out. And my poor little Jimmy! If I have not spoken of him, it is not because I have lost sight of him for a moment.

The day the McRae went down, he arose from his bed, ill as he was, and determined to rejoin her, as his own boat, the Mississippi, was not ready.

When he reached the St. Charles, he fell so very ill that he had to be carried back to Brother's. Only his desperate illness saved him from being among the killed or wounded on that gallant little ship.

A few days after, he learned the fate of the ship, and was told that Captain Huger was dead. No wonder he Page 27 should cry so bitterly! For Captain Huger was as tender and as kind to him as his own dear father.

God bless him for it! The enemy's ships were sailing up; so he threw a few articles in a carpet-bag and started off for Richmond, Corinth, anywhere, to fight.

Sick, weak, hardly able to stand, he went off, two weeks ago yesterday. We know not where, and we have never heard from him since. Whether he succumbed to that jaundice and the rest, and lies dead or dying on the road, God only knows.

We can only wait and pray God to send dear little Jimmy home in safety. And this is WAR! Heaven save me from like scenes and experiences again.

I was wild with excitement last night when Miriam described how the soldiers, marching to the depot, waved their hats to the crowds of women and children, shouting, "God bless you, ladies!

We will fight for you! Early in the evening, four more gunboats sailed up here. We saw them from the corner, three squares off, crowded with men even up in the riggings.

The American flag was flying from every peak. It was received in profound silence, by the hundreds gathered on the banks.

I could hardly refrain from a groan. Much as I once loved that flag, I hate it now! I came back and made myself a Confederate flag about five inches long, slipped the staff in my belt, pinned the flag to my Page 28 shoulder, and walked downtown, to the consternation of women and children, who expected something awful to follow.

An old negro cried, "My young missus got her flag flyin', anyhow! But we were the only two who ventured. We went to the State House terrace, and took a good look at the Brooklyn which was crowded with people who took a good look at us, likewise.

The picket stationed at the Garrison took alarm at half a dozen men on horseback and ran, saying that the citizens were attacking.

The kind officers aboard the ship sent us word that if they were molested, the town would be shelled. Let them! Does it take thirty thousand men and millions of dollars to murder defenseless women and children?

O the great nation! May 11th. I - I am disgusted with myself. No unusual thing, but I am peculiarly disgusted this time.

Last evening, I went to Mrs. Brunot's, without an idea of going beyond, with my flag flying again.

They were all going to the State House, so I went with them; to my great distress, some fifteen or twenty Federal officers were standing on the first terrace, stared at like wild beasts by the curious crowd.

I had not expected to meet them, and felt a painful conviction that I was unnecessarily attracting attention, by an unladylike display of defiance, from the crowd gathered there.

But what was I to do? I felt Page 29 humiliated, conspicuous, everything that is painful and disagreeable; but - strike my colors in the face of the enemy?

Nettie and Sophie had them, too, but that was no consolation for the shame I suffered by such a display so totally distasteful to me.

How I wished myself away, and chafed at my folly, and hated myself for being there, and every one for seeing me. I hope it will be a lesson to me always to remember a lady can gain nothing by such display.

I was not ashamed of the flag of my country, - I proved that by never attempting to remove it in spite of my mortification, - but I was ashamed of my position; for these are evidently gentlemen, not the Billy Wilson's crew we were threatened with.

Fine, noble-looking men they were, showing refinement and gentlemanly bearing in every motion. One cannot help but admire such foes!

They set us an example worthy of our imitation, and one we would be benefited by following. They come as visitors without either pretensions to superiority, or the insolence of conquerors; they walk quietly their way, offering no annoyance to the citizens, though they themselves are stared at most unmercifully, and pursued by crowds of ragged little boys, while even men gape at them with open mouths.

They prove themselves gentlemen, while many of our citizens have proved themselves boors, and I admire them for their conduct.

With a conviction that I had allowed myself to be influenced by bigoted, narrow Page 30 minded people, in believing them to be unworthy of respect or regard, I came home wonderfully changed in all my newly acquired sentiments, resolved never more to wound their feelings, who were so careful of ours, by such unnecessary display.

And I hung my flag on the parlor mantel, there to wave, if it will, in the shades of private life; but to make a show, make me conspicuous and ill at ease, as I was yesterday, - never again!

There was a dozen officers in church this morning, and the psalms for the 11th day seemed so singularly appropriate to the feelings of the people, that I felt uncomfortable for them.

They answered with us, though. May 14th. I am beginning to believe that we are even of more importance in Baton Rouge than we thought we were. It is laughable to hear the things a certain set of people, who know they can't visit us, say about the whole family.

When father was alive, they dared not talk about us aloud, beyond calling us the "Proud Morgans" and the "Aristocracy of Baton Rouge". But now father is gone, the people imagine we are public property, to be criticized, vilified, and abused to their hearts' content.

And now, because they find absurdities don't succeed, they try improbabilities. So yesterday the town was in a ferment because it was reported the Federal officers had called on the Miss Morgans, and Page 31 all the gentlemen were anxious to hear how they had been received.

One had the grace to say, "If they did, they received the best lesson there that they could get in town; those young ladies would meet them with the true Southern spirit.

I suppose the story originated from the fact that we were unwilling to blackguard - yes, that is the word - the Federal officers here, and would not agree with many of our friends in saying they were liars, thieves, murderers, scoundrels, the scum of the earth, etc.

Such epithets are unworthy of ladies, I say, and do harm, rather than advance our cause. Let them be what they will, it shall not make me less the lady; I say it is unworthy of anything except low newspaper war, such abuse, and I will not join in.

I have a brother-in-law in the Federal army whom I love and respect as much as any one in the world, and shall not readily agree that his being a Northerner would give him an irresistible desire to pick my pockets, and take from him all power of telling the truth.

There are few men I admire more than Major Drum, and I honor him for his independence in doing what he believes right. Let us have liberty of speech and action in our land, I say, but not gross abuse and calumny.

Shall I acknowledge that the people we so recently called our brothers are unworthy of consideration, and are liars, cowards, dogs?

Not I! If they conquer us, I Page 32 acknowledge them as a superior race; I will not say that we were conquered by cowards, for where would that place us?

It will take a brave people to gain us, and that the Northerners undoubtedly are. I would scorn to have an inferior foe; I fight only my equals.

These women may acknowledge that cowards have won battles in which their brothers were engaged, but I, I will ever say mine fought against brave men, and won the day.

Which is most honorable? I was never a Secessionist, for I quietly adopted father's views on political subjects without meddling with them.

But even father went over with his State, and when so many outrages were committed by the fanatical leaders of the North, though he regretted the Union, said, "Fight to the death for our liberty.

I want to fight until we win the cause so many have died for. I don't believe in Secession, but I do in Liberty.

I want the South to conquer, dictate its own terms, and go back to the Union, for I believe that, apart, inevitable ruin awaits both. It is a rope of sand, this Confederacy, founded on the doctrine of Secession, and will not last many years - not five.

The North Cannot subdue us. We are too determined to be free. They have no right to confiscate our property to pay debts they themselves have incurred.

Death as a nation, rather than Union on such terms. We will have our rights secured on so firm a basis that it can never be shaken.

If by power of overwhelming numbers they conquer us, it will be a barren victory over a desolate land. Page 33 We, the natives of this loved soil, will be beggars in a foreign land; we will not submit to despotism under the garb of Liberty.

The North will find herself burdened with an unparalleled debt, with nothing to show for it except deserted towns, burning homes, a standing army which will govern with no small caprice, and an impoverished land.

If that be treason, make the best of it! May 17th. One of these days, when peace is restored and we are quietly settled in our allotted corners of this wide world without any particularly exciting event to alarm us; and with the knowledge of what is now the future, and will then be the dead past; seeing that all has been for the best for us in the end; that all has come right in spite of us, we will wonder how we could ever have been foolish enough to await each hour in such breathless anxiety.

We will ask ourselves if it was really true that nightly, as we lay down to sleep, we did not dare plan for the morning, feeling that we might be homeless and beggars before the dawn.

How unreal it will then seem! We will say it was our wild imagination, perhaps. But how bitterly, horribly true it is now!

Four days ago the Yankees left us, to attack Vicksburg, leaving their flag flying in the Garrison without a man to guard it, and with the understanding that the town would be held responsible for it.

It was intended for a trap; and it succeeded. For Page 34 night before last, it was pulled down and torn to pieces.

Now, unless Will will have the kindness to sink a dozen of their ships up there, - I hear he has command of the lower batteries, - they will be back in a few days, and will execute their threat of shelling the town.

If they do, what will become of us? All we expect in the way of earthly property is as yet mere paper, which will be so much trash if the South is ruined, as it consists of debts due father by many planters for professional services rendered, who, of course, will be ruined, too, so all money is gone.

That is nothing, we will not be ashamed to earn our bread, so let it go. But this house is at least a shelter from the weather, all sentiment apart.

And our servants, too; how could they manage without us? The Yankees, on the river, and a band of guerrillas in the woods, are equally anxious to precipitate a fight.

Between the two fires, what chance for us? It would take only a little while to burn the city over our heads. They say the women and children must be removed, these guerrillas.

Where, please? Charlie says we must go to Greenwell. And have this house pillaged? For Butler has decreed that no unoccupied house shall be respected.

If we stay through the battle, if the Federals are victorious, we will suffer. For the officers here were reported to have said, "If the people here did not treat them decently, they would know what it was when Billy Wilson's crew arrived.

Page 35 They would give them a lesson! Heaven help us when they reach here! It is in these small cities that the greatest outrages are perpetrated.

What are we to do? A new proclamation from Butler has just come. It seems that the ladies have an ugly way of gathering their skirts when the Federals pass, to avoid any possible contact.

Some even turn up their noses. Unladylike, to say the least. But it is, maybe, owing to the odor they have, which is said to be unbearable even at this early season of the year.

Butler says, whereas the so-called ladies of New Orleans insult his men and officers, he gives one and all permission to insult any or all who so treat them, then and there, with the assurance that the women will not receive the slightest protection from the Government, and that the men will all be justified.

I did not have time to read it, but repeat it as it was told to me by mother, who is in utter despair at the brutality of the thing.

These men our brothers? Not mine! Let us hope for the honor of their nation that Butler is not counted among the gentlemen of the land. And so, if any man should fancy he cared to kiss me, he could do so under the pretext that I had pulled my dress from under his feet!

That will justify them! And if we decline their visits, they can insult us under the plea of a prior affront.

And not to know even whether you are alive! When Charlie joins the army, we will Page 36 be defenseless, indeed. Come to my bosom, O my discarded carving-knife, laid aside under the impression that these men were gentlemen.

We will be close friends once more. And if you must have a sheath, perhaps I may find one for you in the heart of the first man who attempts to Butlerize me.

I never dreamed of kissing any man save my father and brothers. And why any one should care to kiss any one else, I fail to understand.

And I do not propose to learn to make exceptions. Still no word from the boys. We hear that Norfolk has been evacuated; but no details.

George was there. Gibbes is wherever Johnston is, presumably on the Rappahannock; but it is more than six weeks since we have heard from either of them, and all communication is cut off.

May 21st. I have had such a search for shoes this week that I am disgusted with shopping. I am triumphant now, for after traversing the town in every direction and finding nothing, I finally discovered a pair of boots just made for a little negro to go fishing with, and only an inch and a half too long for me, besides being unbendable; but I seized them with avidity, and the little negro would have been outbid if I had not soon after discovered a pair more seemly, if not more serviceable, which I took without further difficulty.

Behold my tender feet cased in crocodile skin, patent-leather tipped, low-quarter boy's shoes, No. A dernier ressort, vraiment! And this is thanks to war and blockade!

Not a decent shoe in the whole community! Why did not Mark Tapley leave me a song calculated to keep the spirits up, under depressing circumstances?

I need one very much, and have nothing more suggestive than the old Methodist hymn, "Better days are coming, we'll all go right," which I shout so constantly, as our prospects darken, that it begins to sound stale.

May 27th. The cry is "Ho! I don't want to go. If we were at peace, and were to spend a few months of the warmest season out there, none would be more eager and delighted than I: but to leave our comfortable home, and all it contains, for a rough pine cottage seventeen miles away even from this scanty civilization, is sad.

It must be! We are hourly expecting two regiments of Yankees to occupy the Garrison, and some fifteen hundred of our men are awaiting them a little way off, so the fight seems inevitable.

And we must go, leaving what little has already been spared us to the tender mercies of Northern volunteers, Page 38 who, from the specimen of plundering they gave us two weeks ago, will hardly leave us even the shelter of our roof.

O my dear Home! How can I help but cry at leaving you forever? For if this fight occurs, never again shall I pass the threshold of this house, where we have been so happy and sad, the scene of joyous meetings and mournful partings, the place where we greeted each other with glad shouts after even so short a parting, the place where Harry and father kissed us good-bye and never came back again!

I know what Lavinia has suffered this long year, by what we have suffered these last six weeks. Poor Lavinia, so far away!

How easier poverty, if it must come, would be if we could bear it together! I wonder if the real fate of the boys, if we ever hear, can be so dreadful as this suspense?

Still no news of them. My poor little Jimmy! And think how desperate Gibbes and George will be when they read Butler's proclamation, and they not able to defend us!

Gibbes was in our late victory of Fredericksburg, I know. In other days, going to Greenwell was the signal for general noise and confusion.

All the boys gathered their guns and fishing-tackle, and thousand and one amusements; father sent out provisions; we helped mother pack; Hal and I tumbled over the libraries to lay in a supply of reading material; and all was bustle until the carriage drove to the door at daylight one morning, and swept us off.

It is not so gay this time. I wandered around this morning Page 39 selecting books alone. We can only take what is necessary, the rest being left to the care of the Northern militia in general.

I never knew before how many articles were perfectly "indispensable" to me. This or that little token or keepsake, piles of letters I hate to burn, many dresses, etc.

After all our trials and tribulations, here we are at last, and no limbs lost! How many weeks ago was it since I wrote here?

It seems very long after all these events; let me try to recall them. Wednesday the 28th, - a day to be forever remembered, - as luck would have it, we rose very early, and had breakfast sooner than usual, it would seem for the express design of becoming famished before dinner.

I picked up some of my letters and papers and set them where I could find them whenever we were ready to go to Greenwell, burning a pile of trash and leaving a quantity equally worthless, which were of no value even to myself except from association.

I was packing up my traveling-desk with all Harry's little articles that were left to me, and other things, and I was saying to myself that my affairs were in such confusion that if obliged to run unexpectedly I would not know what to save, when I heard Lilly's voice downstairs, crying as she Page 40 ran in - she had been out shopping - "Mr.

Castle has killed a Federal officer on a ship, and they are going to shell -" Bang! Mother had just come in, and was lying down, but sprang to her feet and added her screams to the general confusion.

Miriam, who had been searching the libraries, ran up to quiet her; Lilly gathered her children, crying hysterically all the time, and ran to the front door with them as they were; Lucy saved the baby, naked as she took her from her bath, only throwing a quilt over her.

I bethought me of my "running-bag" which I had used on a former case, and in a moment my few precious articles were secured under my hoops, and with a sunbonnet on, I stood ready for anything.

The firing still continued; they must have fired half a dozen times before we could coax mother off. What awful screams! I had hoped never to hear them again, after Harry died.

Charlie had gone to Greenwell before daybreak, to prepare the house, so we four women, with all those children and servants, were left to save ourselves.

I did not forget my poor little Jimmy; I caught up his cage and ran down. Just at this moment mother recovered enough to insist on saving father's papers - which was impossible, as she had not an idea of where the important ones were.

I heard Miriam plead, argue, insist, command her to run; Lilly shriek, and cry she should go; the children screaming within; women running by without, Page 41 crying and moaning; but I could not join in.

I was going I knew not where; it was impossible to take my bird, for even if I could carry him, he would starve. So I took him out of his cage, kissed his little yellow head, and tossed him up.

He gave one feeble little chirp as if to ascertain where to go, and then for the first and last time I cried, laying my head against the gate-post, and with my eyes too dim to see him.

Oh, how it hurt me to lose my little bird, one Jimmy had given me, too! But the next minute we were all off, in safety. A square from home, I discovered that boy shoes were not the most comfortable things to run in, so I ran back, in spite of cannonading, entreaties, etc.

I got home, found an old pair that were by no means respectable, which I seized without hesitation; and being perfectly at ease, thought it would be so nice to save at least Miriam's and my tooth-brushes, so slipped them in my corsets.

These in, of course we must have a comb - that was added - then how could we stand the sun without starch to cool our faces?

This included the powder-bag; then I must save that beautiful lace collar; and my hair was tumbling down, so in went the tuckingcomb and hair-pins with the rest; until, if there had been any one to speculate, they would have wondered a long while at the singular appearance of a girl who is considered as very slight, usually.

By this time, Miriam, alarmed for me, returned to find me, though urged by Dr. Castleton not Page 42 to risk her life by attempting it, and we started off together.

We had hardly gone a square when we decided to return a second time, and get at least a few articles for the children and ourselves, who had nothing except what we happened to have on when the shelling commenced.

She picked up any little things and threw them to me, while I filled a pillow-case jerked from the bed, and placed my powder and brushes in it with the rest.

Before we could leave, mother, alarmed for us both, came to find us, with Tiche. Every argument we could use was of no avail, and we were desperate as to what course to pursue, when the shelling recommenced in a few minutes.

Then mother recommenced her screaming and was ready to fly anywhere; and holding her box of papers, with a faint idea of saving something, she picked up two dirty underskirts and an old cloak.

By dint of Miriam's vehement appeals, aided by a great deal of pulling, we got her down to the back door. We had given our pillow-case to Tiche, who added another bundle and all our silver to it, and had already departed.

As we stood in the door, four or five shells sailed over our heads at the same time, seeming to make a perfect corkscrew of the air, - for it sounded as 1 Mrs.

Morgan's negro maid, Catiche. Page 43 though it went in circles. Miriam cried, "Never mind the door! We reached the back gate, that was on the street, when another shell passed us, and Miriam jumped behind the fence for protection.

We had only gone half a square when Dr. Castleton begged us to take another street, as they were firing up that one. We took his advice, but found our new street worse than the old, for the shells seemed to whistle their strange songs with redoubled vigor.

The height of my ambition was now attained. I had heard Jimmy laugh about the singular sensation produced by the rifled balls spinning around one's head; and here I heard the same peculiar sound, ran the same risk, and was equal to the rest of the boys, for was I not in the midst of flying shells, in the middle of a bombardment?

I think I was rather proud of it. We were alone on the road, - all had run away before, - so I thought it was for our especial entertainment, this little affair.

I cannot remember how long it lasted; I am positive that the clock struck ten before I left home, but I had been up so long, I know not what time it began, though I am told it was between eight and nine.

We passed the graveyard, we did not even stop, and about a mile and a half from home, when mother was perfectly exhausted with fatigue and unable to proceed farther, we met a gentleman in a buggy who kindly took charge of her and our bundles.

We could have Page 44 walked miles beyond, then, for as soon as she was safe we felt as though a load had been removed from our shoulders; and after exhorting her not to be uneasy about us, and reminding her we had a pistol and a dagger, - I had secured a "for true" one the day before, fortunately, - she drove off, and we trudged on alone, the only people in sight on foot, though occasionally carriages and buggies would pass, going towards town.

One party of gentlemen put their heads out and one said, "There are Judge Morgan's daughters sitting by the road! However, others were very kind.

One I never heard of had volunteered to go for us, and bring us to mother, when she was uneasy about our staying so long, when we went home to get clothes.

We heard him ring and knock, but, thinking it must be next door, paid no attention, so he went back and mother came herself.

We were two miles away when we sat down by the road to rest, and have a laugh. Here were two women married, and able to take care of themselves, flying for their lives and leaving two lorn girls alone on the road, to protect each other!

To be sure, neither could help us, and one was not able to walk, and the other had helpless children to save; but it was so funny when we talked about it, and thought how sorry both would be when they regained their reason!

While we were yet resting, we saw a cart coming, and, giving up all idea of our walking to Page 45 Greenwell, called the people to stop. To our great delight, it proved to be a cart loaded with Mrs.

Brunot's affairs, driven by two of her negroes, who kindly took us up with them, on the top of their luggage; and we drove off in state, as much pleased at riding in that novel place as though we were accustomed to ride in wheelbarrows.

Miriam was in a hollow between a flour barrel and a mattress, and I at the end, astride, I am afraid, of a tremendous bundle, for my face was down the road and each foot resting very near the sides of the cart.

I tried to make a better arrangement, though, after a while. These servants were good enough to lend us their umbrella, without which I am afraid we would have suffered severely, for the day was intensely warm.

Three miles from town we began to overtake the fugitives. Hundreds of women and children were walking along, some bareheaded, and in all costumes.

Little girls of twelve and fourteen were wandering on alone. I called to one I knew, and asked where her mother was; she did n't know; she would walk on until she found out.

It seems her mother lost a nursing baby, too, which was not found until ten that night. White and black were all mixed together, and were as confidential as though related.

All called to us and asked where we were going, and many we knew laughed at us for riding on a cart; but as they had walked only five miles, I imagined they would like even these poor accommodations if they were in their reach.

Hundreds were walking with babies or bundles; ask them what they had saved, it was invariably, "My mistress's clothes, or silver, or baby.

Women searching for their babies along the road, where they had been lost; others sitting in the dust crying and wringing their hands; for by this time we had not an idea but what Baton Rouge was either in ashes, or being plundered, and we had saved nothing.

I had one dress, Miriam two, but Tiche had them, and we had lost her before we left home. Presently we came on a guerrilla camp.

Men and horses were resting on each side of the road, some sick, some moving about carrying water to the women and children, and all looking like a monster barbecue, for as far as the eye could see through the woods, was the same repetition of men and horses.

They would ask for the news, and one, drunk with excitement or whiskey, informed us that it was our own fault if we had saved nothing, the people must have been - fools not to have known trouble would come before long, and that it was the fault of the men, who were aware of it, that the women were thus forced to fly.

In vain we pleaded that there was no warning, no means of foreseeing this; he cried, " You are ruined; so am I; and my brothers, too! And by - there Page 47 is nothing left but to die now, and I'll die!

That was the only swearing guerrilla we met; the others seemed to have too much respect for us to talk loud. Lucy had met us before this; early in the action, Lilly had sent her back to get some baby-clothes, but a shell exploding within a few feet of her, she took alarm, and ran up another road, for three miles, when she cut across the plantations and regained the Greenwell route.

It is fortunate that, without consultation, the thought of running here should have seized us all. May 31st. I was interrupted so frequently yesterday that I know not how I continued to write so much.

First, I was sent for, to go to Mrs. Brunot, who had just heard of her son's death, and who was alone with Dena; and some hours after, I was sent for, to see Fanny, now Mrs.

Trezevant, who had just come with her husband to bring us news of George. A Mrs. Montgomery, who saw him every day at Norfolk, said Jimmy was with him, and though very sick at first, was now in good health.

The first news in all that long time! When the city was evacuated, George went with his regiment seven miles from Richmond, Jimmy to the city itself, as aide to Com.

This lady brought George's opal ring and diamond pin. Howell and Mr. Badger, who had just joined the Page 48 guerrillas as independents, spent the day with me.

We were all in such confusion that I felt ashamed: every one as dirty as possible; I had on the same dress I had escaped in, which, though then perfectly clean, was now rather - dirty.

But they knew what a time we had had. To return to my journal. Lucy met mother some long way ahead of us, whose conscience was already reproaching her for leaving us, and in answer to her "What has become of my poor girls?

When she met us, she walked by the cart, and it was with difficulty we persuaded her to ride a mile; she said she felt "used" to walking now. About five miles from home, we overtook mother.

The gentleman had been obliged to go for his wife, so Mary gave her her seat on the cart, and walked with Lucy three miles beyond, where we heard that Lilly and the children had arrived in a cart, early in the day.

All the talk by the roadside was of burning homes, houses knocked to pieces by balls, famine, murder, desolation; so I comforted myself singing, "Better days are coming" and "I hope to die shouting, the Lord will provide"; while Lucy toiled through the sun and dust, and answered with a chorus of "I'm a-runnin', a-runnin' up to glo-ry!

David's and found Lilly. How warm and tired we were! A hasty meal, which tasted like a feast after our Page 49 fatigue, gave us fresh strength, and Lilly and Miriam got in an old cart with the children to drive out here, leaving me with mother and Dellie to follow next day.

About sunset, Charlie came flying down the road, on his way to town. I decided to go, and after an obstinate debate with mother, in which I am afraid I showed more determination than amiability, I wrung a reluctant consent from her, and, promising not to enter if it was being fired or plundered, drove off in triumph.

It was a desperate enterprise for a young girl, to enter a town full of soldiers on such an expedition at night; but I knew Charlie could take care of me, and if he was killed I could take care of myself; so I went.

It was long after nine when we got there, and my first act was to look around the deserted house. What a scene of confusion! I no longer recognized my little room.

She is numbering bonds, but, with pen poised for a moment in air, in her erect regal dignity, looks not unlike Marie Antoinette when about to affix her signature to some royal document of grace.

In those vanished days, as a queen, she daily gave audience at Page 19 her desk. The younger ladies, with one accord when through with their personal allotment of notes, were ever ready to assist this superb old lady with her bonds.

Many of the note-signers of that year, , dressed in most unusual fashion - a creation of hard times. Handsome clothes, that seemed sadly out of place, were not infrequently in that old room.

One day, in the yard, a pot of machine oil coming in contact with some burning waste, caught on fire.

It seemed as if a conflagration was imminent. The smoke ascended and billowed through the room, causing a sad flutter and fright among "Memminger's Canary birds," as the ladies were facetiously called.

They swayed from side to side peering through the dense clouds of smoke at the open windows, seeking an avenue of escape.

Finally, moved by a common impulse, they rushed pell-mell down the stairs into the open street, some with hair flying in the wind, without bonnets, hats or cloaks - all forgotten in their mad panic.

The worst that came of it was a waggish paragraph in the next day's paper. There was one order of the Bureau officials, so considerate as to deserve mention.

Whenever the day ended in rain. This humane bit of courtesy, coupled with the rather humorous resolution passed by Congress declaring that in calling for the ages of clerks in various departments, it was not understood to include that of the ladies, certainly, in the eyes of the ladies themselves, distinguished our Southern Government as one rarely chivalrous.

The spring-time of with its lustrous mocking sunshine passed, and never were the Solfaterre roses sweeter, nor the oleanders whiter in the gardens of Columbia, nor the Congaree Falls more musical as we listened to their play in the midnight silence, and dreamed of Lee and victory.

Then the long, slow summer came and went, and the dreary autumn Page 20 followed. With its going, we began to live on anticipated horrors.

The new year of dawned sadly enough. There was much talk of Sherman's advance, and an effort was made to draw troops from Lee for the defence of Columbia; but in vain, every soldier was needed for Richmond.

After Sherman's burning of Columbia - involving the destruction of the money-printing machine and of a large amount of Treasury notes - there was some expectation at the close of February, of removing the employes to Lynchburg, Virginia, and of starting anew the manufacture of the notes.

But chaos had come again and this scheme was never carried through. The collapse of all things dear to the Confederate heart was close at hand.

Appomattox followed swiftly upon the evacuation of the Capital, and then - "the Confederacy took its place in the graveyard of nations.

Thomas, Judah P. Benjamin was born of well educated Hebrew-English parentage. This beautiful isle, as in sunshine and greenery it rests in the arms of old ocean, might well be called a Darling of the Deep.

Cyclone and hurricane sometimes come to play rough games among its lofty hills; but usually no sky is softer than the blue dome above; no sunlight more bounteous in its floods of gold; no breezes more odorous than those which come from the salt sea perfumed by the richness of tropic bloom.

And the cradlesong of the young Israelite born in the midst of this natural loveliness was the rustle of mighty groves of palms, mingled with the unceasing surge of the wild Caribbean Sea.

With such an environment of storm and grace, was it strange that our nursling of the tropics should, through all the years of life, have felt their quickening influence in heart and brain?

It is a coincidence that out of the West Indies should have come, from the twin-sister islets of St.

Croix and St. Thomas, two of her greatest sons to unite their names and fortunes with the mighty Republic of the West. Alexander Hamilton came in an epoch of seething storm and revolution to be the trusted friend of Washington and to sit in her councils of State.

Later, came Judah P. Benjamin to make himself ready for the services of a younger nation that the prophetic soul of Hamilton already saw dimly shaped in the future.

In , the green hills of St. Thomas sloped below the horizon and the Southern Cross faded from view as - his fortunes at a low ebb - Benjamin pere , with wife and children, left forever behind the sunny little island to seek a home of larger possibilities in the United States.

Landing in Charleston, South Carolina, he resolved to secure for his young tribe that liberal, lasting wealth of which adversity could not rob them. The children of Benjamin were at once sent to a popular academy.

Here Judah proved so diligent and aspiring a student that at the age of fourteen he entered Yale. The Page 22 soul of the ambitious boy must have grown dark when, for lack of funds at the end of his second year he was compelled to discontinue his collegiate course without gaining his coveted degree.

Early realizing that he was no petted favorite of fortune, but that the glittering baubles of success and reputation were to be forced by his own unaided strength from her closed, unwilling hand, with the resolute patience of his race he at once faced the struggle.

In , destiny drew the friendless boy to New Orleans. Here we find him in the office of a notary delving as clerk, but, meanwhile, scant as was his leisure, studying law and, the better to understand the complicated jurisprudence of Louisiana, mastering the French and Spanish languages.

At twenty-one, on December 16, , he was admitted to the bar, and so encouraging was his future that, in the spring of the following year, with the confidence of youth in himself and in his own bright star, he led to the altar Miss Natalie St.

Martin - a beautiful Creole girl of New Orleans. Upon her and the daughter Ninette, who came to bless their union, he lavished without stint all the wealth of his affections and purse.

As he was now a man of family, he also became one of affairs. He spent much time on his plantation of Bellechasse , deeply interested in the chemistry of sugar, and gave his leisure to writing articles both practical and entertaining for magazines.

Such work was delightful recreation for one who loved the humanities and was accomplished without neglect of Chitty and Blackstone.

But while engaged in work so congenial the failure of a friend, for whom he had endorsed notes for a large amount, so crippled his fortune that he resolutely closed his ears to the enticements of literature, and turned with renewed ardor to the practice of his profession.

Henceforth, though interested like a good citizen in all that made for the public welfare, the world knew him best as the silvery-tongued, eloquent orator, and famous, astute lawyer.

Elected in , to the legislature of Louisiana, ten years later he was sent to the Senate of the United States.

In that great body of statesmen he was peer of the highest. A disciplee of Calhoun, he held to state sovereignty in his brilliant speeches upon noted questions involving the two great issues Page 23 of the day - Centralization of Government and State Rights.

Upon the secession of his adopted State, with warm enthusiasm of feeling and in far-reaching musical tones, he expressed his conviction that the "State of Louisiana had judged and acted wisely in this crisis of her destiny.

Lewis - a cool-headed, discriminating Englishman present at its delivery - to "be better than what D'Israeli could have done.

In Richmond, upon re-organization of Government on a constitutional basis, he was made Secretary of War. With its stern, dry complexity of duties he was not familiar, as several disastrous events soon proved.

Not relishing the caustic criticisms of the public upon his administration of the War Department, he resigned his portfolio; but in February, , President Davis who delighted in honoring him, invited him to take a seat in the Cabinet as Secretary of State - which he retained to the end of the Confederate Government.

To him, both by training and temperament, diplomacy was congenial. True, he failed in his unwearied efforts to secure recognition for our young nation by the great European Powers; but we may safely assume it was because the Star of Empire shone not upon the cradle of the Southern Confederacy.

When the swords of great Lee, Stonewall Jackson and Stuart could not achieve our independence, surely Benjamin may be pardoned that he did not gain our admission into the family of nations.

When Richmond fell, Benjamin, true to his personal friend the President, with the other Cabinet officers, accompanied him to Danville.

All the long, dreary way he was the life of the party. When the President went southwards he was still at his side; but, on arriving at Washington, Ga.

Thomas - the isle of his birth. Thence, once more he set out to fight the battle of life in a foreign land - this time, he was middle-aged, a man of fifty-five.

Landing in Liverpool, he hastened to London and took up the study of English law. In June, , a year after planting foot on the soil of Great Britain, he was admitted to the English courts as barrister at law.

Six years passed, and in , he became Queen's Counselor and presently was so famous as to appear solely before the House of Lords and Privy Council.

A portrait of him in his Counselor's wig - his dark, intellectual Semitic face framed in stiff rows of white woolen curls - clearly shows in its triumphant smile the indomitable heart and persevering genius of his great race.

In his Hebrew lexicon there was no such word as fail. Overthrown on one plane, he never lost heart, but was ready cheerily to challenge Fate to another wrestle - ever another, and again so long as life lasted!

In the early spring of , failing health admonished him to lead a less strenuous life, and he resolved to give up his magnificent practice which now ensured him a fortune of 18, pounds in English money - the third he had made.

Before his final retirement to Paris, leading members of the English bar bestowed upon him a most unusual honor. Desiring to take a collective farewell and to testify their high sense of the honor and integrity of his professional career, and of their desire for a continuance of their relations of personal friendship they tendered him a grand complimentary banquet June, , in the Hall of the Inner Temple.

Sir Henry James on this occasion, in allusion to his forensic ability, voiced the recognition of all present when he asked: "Who is the man, save this one, of whom it can be said that he held conspicuous leadership at the bar of two countries?

With the well-merited plaudits of all England ringing in his ears, he crossed the Channel for the last time.

A Hebrew, he never obtruded, nor endeavored to conceal the birth of which he was proud. He might well say that "the world was his home.

Here, he died May 6, He now sleeps in the famed Cemetery of Pere la Chaise. Is it not singular to find that this great man - who in a momentous epoch of the national history cast his fortune with the South, when doubtless he could have secured preferment at the North - should be so misjudged and accused by men of the present day?

If, as has been alleged, he carried with him the great seal, he but took his own property; for unless surrendered to the victor, such it became with the collapse of the government.

He thus saved it from desecration; and if he retained it during life there was then no organization which could receive this, no doubt the most sacred of his treasures; and even if there had been, he was under no obligation to part with it until he chose.

If, as has been asserted, he donated it to British keeping, he but put it into the care of the world's most powerful and most reverent custodian. And after all, is it not fitting that the longest-lived of the English nations should guard this relic of the shortest-lived?

If Benjamin left the South in the day of her overthrow, he did no more than a score of her generals did, and no more than Davis was trying to do.

Glance at the prospect before him as he surveyed the future with the President at Washington. The Confederacy was dead.

The Chief Executive and his official family were fugitives. If captured, they could look for nothing less than imprisonment - a merciless vengeance, possibly the hangman's cord from the hands of a party at the North, drunken and crazed with power and flushed with conquest over their sister-section.

In addition to this sinister prospect, he knew that all the resources and power of the Confederacy had perished in its death struggle. What was Page 26 there for him in Louisiana, what could he do to aid or comfort her in her vast humiliation?

With the vision of a seer, he must have seen the destiny that was to be hers - the judiciary of which she was once so proud subjected to the rule of the sword, even judges holding their place by sufferance.

The dearest part of a man's country is ever said to be his own family and fireside. Benjamin's household gods yet remained and his allegiance as husband and father was due to them.

Look at the long list shining with the names of other eminent Confederates who, after the surrender, in that first dark hour of collapse and a noble despair sought other lands in which to hide the agony of their hearts, in which to live.

Let us single out a few. See Robert Toombs - than whom never breathed a more rampant, defiant, devoted Southerner - yet he, chafing at defeat like an entrapped lion, remained abroad until John Taylor Wood - the brother-in-law of the President and his aide-de-camp - when all was over, escaped to Cuba and subsequently lived in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

General Early, after riding like a paladin long and hard to attach himself to a Confederate force and continue the war. General John B. Magruder - called "Prince John" on account of his lordly air - sought relief for his exasperation by enlisting in the army of Maximilian and remained with him until his downfall.

Our own loved Henry Watkins Allen, Governor of Louisiana and gallant officer in the Southern army - unable to stand the changed conditions brought on by the war - took himself with his broken heart to die in Mexico.

But why add to the list? Against not one of these heroic souls of the Confederacy has envy or detraction ever raised slanderous voice impugning their patriotism.

Why then against Judah P. Would it not be ungenerous to ascribe this petty resentment of which he is the victim to the fact that he was a Jew and, therefore, heir to all the obloquy Page 27 that Christian tongues have too often meted out to his race.

But, rather does it not remind one of the antique Cato's criticism upon the breach between Caesar and Pompey? A weakness of humanity! When a bond of union has once existed, we are apt to take ill even the appearance of a transfer of affection.

Instead of looking coldly upon one who was ever true to his brethren of the Confederacy, rather should we hold in highest esteem this official of our short-lived Government who in a strange land won honor and dignities so notable.

Those honors, by reflection, are ours. Though the Atlantic rolled between the country of his early and that of his later life, yet will the name and fame of Judah P.

Benjamin - three times chosen to a seat in her Cabinet - ever be proudly and indissolubly associated with that of the Southern Confederacy.

IN April, , when the bruit of a naval attack upon New Orleans by way of the Gulf, first began to fill the air, it created little more apprehension than an incredulous shrug of the shoulders, or a laugh that one could be so silly as to believe the canard.

Did not Secretary Mallory believe that the invasion would come from above the city, not below the forts? Surely, he must know better than these idle rumor-makers!

Serenely, therefore, in the afternoon after closing his store, the merchant would stroll to the foot of Canal street to enjoy the fresh breeze, and while watching the swollen river - its muddy waters creeping stealthily but steadily, night and day, to the top of the levee - would speculate with his friends upon the probable height of the June rise, when the Missouri would empty upon its current vast floods of thawed snow and ice.

Crevasses that endangered the orange orchards and fields of growing sweet cane troubled his thrifty mind far more than D.

Farragut, "Flag-officer western blockading squadron. A number of foreign steamers stood in the harbor laden with heavy cargoes of cotton for their return trip across the Atlantic.

Around others at the wharves was the cheery hum of contented labor. The red-shirted stevedores, with their iron hooks were toiling and tugging, to the measured rhythm of an old minstrel melody, at the hundreds of bales that crowded the levee to get them aboard before night-fall.

Up and down the sheds and over the wharves - as though a flock of sheep had passed through and paid toll with their wool - were great bunches and shreds of the fleecy staple, and everywhere the white lint floated in the pleasant April air.

Out in the harbor, too, was a staunch little fleet of thirteen vessels, bearing among others such martial names as the Warrior, Defiance, Resolute and the Stonewall Jackson.

Some of these were "converted vessels" - that is, river steamers made Page 29 shot-proof with cotton bulkheads and provided with iron prows to act as rams, and among these were a few tug-boats for pushing fire-rafts on the enemy, should an engagement ever take place.

Yet on her "ways" at the ship-yard in the Jefferson suburb was the naval monster, Mississippi - since said by two navies to have been the most formidable war vessel ever built.

Although unfinished, she was fast nearing completion and it was expected that she would rival, or out-do, the dashing exploits of the Virginia in Hampton Roads.

The Manassas, glorious name but ill of prophecy, was lying above Fort Jackson eager to try conclusions with Farragut's fleet, should the Admiral be so daring as to extend a challenge.

Surely, that was a name to be relied upon as a sponsor for the protection of New Orleans! This formidable ironclad was not much of a trim, nautical craft to please the eye, but it was thought to be a fearful menace to the insolent ship that might brave its guns.

Far down the river - thirty miles from its mouth on the western bank - was Fort Jackson, guardian of the Passes and the first outpost of defence.

Named in honor of the Hero of New Orleans, it bristled with guns and was garrisoned by a goodly complement of soldiers.

A few hundred yards above on the eastern bank, the older fort, St. Philip, well gunned and manned, stood sentinel, and more securely to obstruct the river against possible invasion of New Orleans, was a barrier of schooners lashed amidships and anchored across the stream between the forts.

So, upon this fatal 24th of April, , New Orleans, cradled in war, was not to be scared. Trusting in the strength and loyalty of her forts and in the might of her steam rams - two bearing as talismans against shot and shell the names of Gulf States, and one with the name of a Northern rout - she believed herself invincible.

Off in the Gulf, an invasion that threatened might seem alarming, but in the city no one was alarmed. The laugh, the song and the dance went merrily on with the gilded youth on General Lovell's staff and the dark-eyed girls of Creoledom.

In the gardens, the red roses and scarlet lilies bloomed in the spring sunlight with ominous Page 30 significance of color, but the Queen City of the South - trusting in her defences on river and land - serenely pursued the even tenor of her way.

The Louisiana was simply a huge vessel built upon a dry dock. In appearance, to one not versed in naval architecture - as its unwieldy bulk lay heavily upon the water - it was not unlike the sloping roof of a house with ridge cut off by a broad open inclosure that, in turn, was surrounded by a parapet.

Through this inclosure, like a curious swarthy giant looking out upon the world, loomed its smoke-stack. It was propelled by four engines and was to have been mounted by sixteen guns and carry a crew of two hundred men.

General Duncan, commander of the two forts, harassed by the fire of Commodore Porter's mortar-boats, called upon Commodore Mitchell of the naval forces at New Orleans for the services of the Louisiana.

Yet incomplete, unwillingly, she was ordered down. With machinists and mechanics at work on her propellers, on the 20th of April, under command of Captain Charles F.

McIntosh, she was towed down the river - as brave men believed - to be the guardian angel of the river defence.

Half a mile above St. Philip she was moored to the left bank. On the 22nd, as the bombardment increased in severity, General Duncan requested Commodore Mitchell to move the Louisiana farther down the river so that she might drive the mortar-schooners off.

The Commodore declined, for the reason that the Louisiana's machinery was not yet in working order; that the engineers hoped to have it in a day or two; that its top was unprotected, and if a shell dropped on it, it would pass through the bottom and inevitably sink the ship, etc.

It was the same old story so often told of our gun-boats - a state of unpreparedness when occasion demanded their services. General Duncan, naturally believing that the Louisiana was built for use and should take some risks, felt aggrieved at the Commodore's decision - although in its propriety he was supported by all his officers - and unfortunately, from this time, all cordiality between the forts and fleet ceased to exist.

At a. The mortars were mute; the forts stopped their fire, and the only sound that broke the stillness was the rush of the Mississippi, as the mighty current of its yellow flood went swirling in the pitchy darkness to its watery bourne in the Gulf.

Inside Fort Jackson, just as longingly as the besieged Antwerpers in watched for Gianbelli's "hell-burners," or fireships, that were to destroy the bridge of Farnese across the Scheldt, so did Duncan and the brave St.

Mary's Cannoneers watch throughout that woeful, memorable night, counting the hours in hopeless despair of aid from the fire-barges at New Orleans.

Through some one's blunder, the fire-ships, that would have carried dismay and destruction into the enemy's fleet, were not sent down on the one night when they might have turned the dark fortunes of the hour.

The sinister quiet did not last long. In one awful instant a wild glare lit up the scene. Then like the deafening detonation of a volcano with its myriad quakings, throbbings and blazings came a crash and a horrible din.

Porter's mortar-boats reopened their bombardment, with a shriek and roar of bursting shells, grape, canister and shrapnel. Forts Jackson and St.

Philip responded with fury, but little effect. But his appeal was heard only by the night winds struggling with the dense smoke that, belching from the mortars, added to the gloom of the night.

Under cover of darkness and the fierce hail of the mortar-boats, Farragut's fleet like ill- omened ghosts - each vessel grimed with river-mud to make it more a part of the night - under a full pressure of steam made the historic passage of the forts.

Each one in rushing past poured broadside after broadside of shot and shell in swift succession into the forts. Once past, safe and victorious from the perilous transit, they steamed slowly up the river to their appointed rendezvous at Quarantine Station, six miles above.

The passage of the fleet was brief in point of time - less than two hours - but long in tension as human hearts beat. Unhappily, however, the colors while inspiring courage could not confirm loyalty.

Mutiny broke out in the two forts and signals were exchanged between the mutineers. Perhaps here best may be emphasized a consolation for state pride.

No native Louisianian was among the mutineers. In the meantime, the iron-clad Louisiana, pulling and tugging at her moorings and longing like a fierce mastiff held in leash to get at the enemy, had fired only a few scattering shots from her guns.

Owing to the position in which she had been made fast to the bank and to the incompleted condition of her interior, her guns could not be trained so effectively upon the enemy's advancing fleet as had been hoped.

After the gallant work of the "Manassas" in her bold rush upon the "Hartford" and her subseuent disablement, the "Louisiana" received her officers and men aboard.

On the 27th negotiations for the surrender of the forts were initiated by Commodore Porter, of the mortar-flotilla.

On the 28th, disheartened by the mutiny of garrisons in the forts and the reported capture of New Orleans, the conditions were accepted by General Duncan.

Soon after, the Harriet Lane with Commodore Porter and officers - a white flag at the fore - came opposite the forts to receive and sign the terms of capitulation.

Negotiations were proceeding amicably on the Harriet Lane, when on the Mississippi - of late so rich in stately spectacles - appeared a portent as awful as it was mysterious, floating by to interrupt the proceedings on board.

It was the "Louisiana," once a powerful iron-clad, but at this moment a helpless wreck, drifting and discharging her guns at random. How worse than useless!

The fleet which she had been specially armed to resist and terrify, was lying at victorious peace in the river in front of New Orleans.

The mortar-schooners which she might, if properly handled, have gripped hard and sunk with her powerful battery, were near the head of the Passes, warily watching her and the forts.

Hopeless to save her from the superior power bearing down on her from every side, her officers set her on fire, and sent her with all her guns protruding, down the river.

Although in her death Page 33 throes drifting aimlessly as the current bore her, she was more fortunate than her sister-craft - the great steam-ram "Mississippi" - which was taken above the city, riddled and burned before she had fired a gun!

Abandoned to her own terrible self, the luckless "Louisiana" floated down in the presence of the guns of the mortar-fleet. The clumsy mortars, as she drifted past, struggled to escape the blazing wreck, even in its ruin a menace.

When near her old moorings close to St. Philip, suddenly, from the great iron-clad came the deafening explosion of her powder magazine, scattering fragments of her wood-work everywhere within and around the fortifications; then a mighty plunge like some wallowing monster of the deep and the "Louisiana" sank into the abyss of waters!

The blowing-up, as if in angry protest against surrender, shook the signers of the capitulation from their seats and careened the "Harriet Lane" on her side.

Once righted, her officers rushed on deck, but saw only the river flowing sullenly to the Gulf, while not a ripple upon the surface showed where the "Louisiana" had committed her awful suicide.

It looked like the grimmest irony or a hostile fate, that the only casualties from the Louisiana's formidable battery should have comprised one of our own men killed in the fort, and three or four wounded.

So, in a flame of fire, ashes and glory perished the ill-starred "Louisiana," on whose strength and the stout hearts beating within her iron ribs had rested so many fond hopes.

She never fulfilled the purpose for which she was built; but who dares deny that her phantom flag will float over the river, from New Orleans to the Passes, so long as the Mississippi has memories!

A vague unrest born of premonition seemed to permeate the congregation as, dismissed by the rector, they slowly moved down the aisles to the central exit.

At the doorway, as Miss X. In a low tone was whispered: "I am just from St. The President received a dispatch and left the church in haste.

Ewell has ordered out the militia. It is said that Richmond is to be evacuated to-night. A look that spoke volumes was interchanged and the friends silently tried to make their way through the steadily increasing, questioning crowds on the sidewalks.

Already the direful news was in the air, but its effects were stunning rather than demonstrative of either anger or grief.

It seemed as if a mephitic vapor had fallen from midair and clogged the utterance of speech. People looked at each other and in some subtle way understood that all was over, that love, valor, sacrifice - not even Lee in whom they trusted - could do aught more for the proud Capital of the Confederacy.

It was doomed! And yet the heavens smiled serenely fair! It seemed so strange to see that bright sunshine on the streets and the skies so blue, when the cold shadow of despair was creeping over human hearts.

The friends hurried home and packed a few necessaries in handbags. Now, their number augmented by two others, they hurried to the depot.

It was about 4 p. What was remarkable was the fact that there were no noisy protests when trunks were refused.

All was confusion of moment; but it was a confusion dominated by a sullen silence of disappointment Page 35 and heart-break.

No ticket agent was in sight. It was "save himself who can. All Richmond was now upon the streets. They passed groups blanched in face standing at street corners, or leaning over the gates of residences asking in troubled tones for the latest news from Lee - their alarm increased by belated orderlies who, carrying despatches, clattered by with whip and spur.

It seemed impossible for the four young women to get out of the beleagured city, and yet it was equally impossible for them to remain and face the invading army on the morrow.

They knew that they were desperately hungry, for they had eaten nothing for hours - that was the first point. After a scant meal of corn bread and cold turnips left from dinner of the day before, again the quartette with anxious hearts footed the long weary way back to the depot.

It was now about 8 p. In the semi-darkness, companies of cavalry, like phantom horsemen speaking to none, but stern and grim, thundered over the stony pavements; the gutters ran a river of strong drink and a rabble, both white and black, knelt upon the ground and leaning over the edge drank of its flow like swine, or filled buckets and bottles to take home.

Knots of negroes gathered on the sidewalks and seemed dazed, as if they could not make out the turn of events. Like their masters, they too were under the spell that forbade utterance or emotion.

Through this half-drunken, but almost mute crowd, the four friends reached the depot. A long line of cars was drawn up that in the uncertain light seemed to stretch a league into outer darkness, and promise accommodation for the constantly increasing mob of refugees.

But again the girls found that expostulations, entreaties, prayers were only a waste of vital energy. However, deliverance was at hand.

A rough, but sympathetic official standing near, wearied perchance with the feminine din, gruffly said: "Ladies, this is a Government train with no room for civilian passengers, but, if you will go, the only place is on top of the cars.

Up that ladder at the end is where you have to go. A perpendicular climb of several yards and afterward should they survive the attempt, a ride through rain or shine on top of a car.

Oh, shades of Southern ancestry and instincts of feminine reserve! But it was the time for action, not words. Miss X. Out of that city she had to go,for her two brothers lying in soldiers' graves had sworn that their sisters should never be within the enemy's lines.

Bravely, she seized a round of the ladder and with strong pulls finally reached the sloping top. Amid hysterical encouragement to one another, friend followed friend, until the four were aboard, drawn up close together on what seemed a central plank, on top of a carriage that promised both peril and discomfort.

The train lingered and from their point of vantage they looked with aching hearts upon the motley scene below, and thought with dread upon what the morrow was to bring forth.

The car on which they perched was out in the open and they watched the rockets, signalling retreat and disaster, flashing high up among the stars.

They shivered in the chill night air and drew closer together as a dull report following an explosion was heard, or the blaze of a house in flames lit up the darkness.

Towards the morning hours the train pulled out on its long journey, and the last view of the heroic city by the James was framed in the smoke and flames of burning cotton and tobacco.

Away the train sped through desolate fields, but ever under a mocking blue sky. Not much chance or desire for conversation was there.

Sometimes, an overhanging branch from a wayside tree made the ladies duck their heads to escape a stinging slap in the face, and the swinging of the cars on long unrepaired roads produced a giddiness as if tossed on the ocean waves.

At last, the long dreary day ended. That night, April 3rd, at 11 o'clock, Danville was reached and the free ride was over.

Half asleep from exhaustion and fatigue, stiff from cramped muscles and faint from the fast of hours, Miss X. Imagine the amazement of the adventurous damsels, when horrified friends informed them that they had made the journey from Richmond to Danville atop an ammunition train!

NOTE - This and the following sketch are compiled from the author's own personal experience while as Miss Ada Stuart she served the Confederate Government so loyally and faithfully.

There was a thrill in the air, a lustre in the light, a joyous beauty all around that seemed strangely out of tune with the sorrowful drama-of-war played by man beneath the ever-smiling, unclouded sky.

The gardens bloomed like a second Eden; undisturbed by human tragedy, the aspens danced lightly in the soft sunshine, flinging their gossamer lace-like shadows over the green lawns; and every breeze that swept the cheek came laden with rich perfume from the forest jasmine.

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